Q&A with May WCA@Lunch Speaker: Mica Mosbacher

Q&A with May WCA@Lunch Speaker: Mica Mosbacher

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Mica_Mosbacher-768x512Mica Mosbacher, Honorary Consul General of Iceland, philanthropist, journalist, author, and news commentator, will join WCA on May 18 to share stories about her life, steering us to understand that “God Can’t Steer a Parked Car: My self-made career as a journalist, achieved while juggling life as a single mother.” Mica will tell us about turning surviving into thriving as she continues to build a successful career as a media contributor and surrogate speaker. We sat down with Mica this week to get a sneak peek for next Wednesday’s WCA@Lunch:

WCA: Tell us about the phrase: “God can’t steer a parked car.”

I first heard the expression at a University of Texas Campus Crusade for Christ Bible Study. The premise is that you need to pray and have faith but you also need to keep your wheels in motion while listening to your inner voice that comes from God. God, or the Universe (regardless of your religion), can guide your steps but you cannot remain paralyzed if you are to find your place in the world.  I believe in serendipity and that there are no coincidences in life.

WCA: Would please share about how your career in communications started/evolved?

I began my career in communications early on as I wrote short stories and plays at an early age. As a 10-year-old girl in Memphis, Tenn., I started a neighborhood newsletter using the old fashioned mimeograph’s purple ink. No one under the age of 50 will know what that is. I also helped the local precinct chair put out yard signs and handed out flyers for Howard Baker, who was running for the Senate.

Later, I went to Hollins University and spent a semester interning at the NBC-TV affiliate in Houston under legendary news director, Ray Miller. I said in an interview that I would sweep floors.  I ended up doing on camera reporting and radio broadcasts. I transferred to UT Austin and ended up working at The Daily Texan and later at the state capital. I ultimately ended up in corporate communications working for two energy companies, Houston Natural Gas (Enron) and Mitchell Energy for their in-house publications. They provided a generous travel budget and freedom to write on a variety of subjects.

Later, I would work for Southern Political Consulting as a press secretary. After I married and had a child, I went to work as a volunteer for George H. W.  Bush (then VP) and later as a press secretary when he ran for President in 1987. I suppose politics and writing are two ongoing themes in my life. Following my divorce, I worked in retail while continuing to launch a freelance writing career after hours.

For the last 20-plus years, I have helped fundraise for many statewide and national candidates including roles in five presidential campaigns.

WCA: What is the biggest lessons you have learned?

We all endure many losses in life that involve change. Change is our only constant.  Personally, I have gone through kidnapping, parents’ divorce, my divorce, loss of a spouse, layoff of a job and losing of parents. I know that you have to play the hand you are dealt and stay in motion. Through loss of a job at Oppenheimer and Co., I met my late husband Robert, Sr.  He was a wildcatter, world champion sailor, US Secretary of Commerce and an amazing husband.

God never closes a door without opening a window. The key is to persevere and soldier on.  Believe!

WCA: How did racing cars inspire you to move forward?

While my husband was in hospice care at MD Anderson Cancer Center in 2010, my brother John McCutcheon was scheduled to race at the Rolex 24 Endurance Motorsports race in Daytona.  He knew I needed a reason to go on. I went after Bob died. I was sad and depressed but while in the pits, I heard those engines start and my heart skipped a beat.  And that led to a new passion.  One must always have a purpose to go on and so we put together Godstone Ranch MS race for charity.

WCA: Who/what inspires you?

Those whom I admire most stretch their heads out of their comfort zone and make a difference by speaking up for those without a voice.  Susan B. Anthony, who started the Temperance Movement also started the anti-slavery society and circulated a petition that got 400,000 signatures to abolish slavery.  She also got the women’s vote.

Any woman can light a candle in a dark room and I challenge all of you to bring light into your corner of the world.

Noemi Ortiz is a copywriter and editor with more than five years of experience in various industries, including fashion.

Women Communicators of Austin

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